Report of School Board

School Year 1917

To the Voters of Belmont :

     In compliance with the law and custom we submit to you our annual report. Schools have been maintained the past year in all the school buildings except at Jamestown, with some increase in attendance in the rural schools. We are free to say that all have been a success. The high cost of living has been felt in schoolwork as in elsewhere. Teachers salaries have been advanced to some extent to meet the increase in living expense.  Janitor service has also cost more but is still done at a very low cost consitering the time and care nesessary. The fuel question is a vital with us as we had half a supply at the Gale this year.We have bought all the dry wood avalible but before this is in print the school will have to be closed for lack of fuel. The rural schools have a better supply of wood and we antisipate no trouble from that sourse next year.

     The last legislature changed the law so that financial school year closes August 31 instead of  February 15 as heretofore, so that we are giving report Feb. 15, 1917 to Jan. 31,  1918 and our next well  be from the present time to Aug. 31, 1918, the balance of this school year. As we are closing accounts earlier this year with schools still in session, our cash balance is larger than usual but the expences from Feb.1 will use most of it. The last legislature increased the cost to towns for high school and academy tuition from $40 to $55.00 per year as we have 20 pupils in secondary schools at present time it will be seen that there is a call for increased appropriations for this and our tax has gone down proportionally until this past year we received but one-tenth the amount paid. Our returns from the State for the various items of state aid were $400 less the past year than 1916.

     The law requires that the warrant contain an article to see if the district will provide for medical inspection. As we have had two years experience under the law we submit it to the voters without recommendation. The change in the school year makes it necessary for you to make appropriation to cover the balance of this - that is the coming spring term and also a full year from Sept1 to Aug 31, 1919 and we submit for your consiteration the following amounts.

                    Estimates to August 31, 1918 to August 31, 1919

Salaries

$1,715.00

Tuition

$335.00

Conveyance

$40.00

Supplies

$100.00

Officer salaries

$50.00

Repairs

$100.00

Miscellaneous

$100.00

Totals

$2,500.00

                        August 31, 1918 to August 31, 1919

Amount required by law

$1.650.00

General school fund

$2,500.00

Tuition

$1,000.00

Books and Supplies

$300.00

Repairs

$200.00

Officer salaries

$150.00

Totals

$5,800.00

Respectfully submitted

Lillian Knowles , James C. Hill , Carleton Lamprey

School Board of Belmont

 

Financial Report

Revenue

Balance from last year

$136.32

Entire amount of money required by law to be raised 1917

$1,650.00

Entire additional amount voted at school meeting 1917

$1,900.00

Amount assessed to pay for books and supplies

$300.00

Amount assessed to pay tuition at high schools or academy

$1,050.00

Amount assessed to pay for flags & appurtenances

$15.00

Amount assessed to pay for salaries and expenses of district officers

$150.00

Amount of literary fund received from State Dec. 1917

$165.60

Amount receiced from the state tresury , under chapter 158 Session laws of 1909

For district superintendant

$211.50

State aide for average attendance

$246.54

State aide for tuition rebate

$89.77

State aide for qualified teachers

$286.00

Amount received for dog licenses

$193.20

Amount received from other sources not listed above

$0.00

Amount voted to pay notes of district

$250.00

Amount voted to pay insurance

$0.00

Amount voted to pay for repairs

$200.00

Received for paper sold

$2.20

Received for refund orders over paid

$13.50

Total Revenue

$6859.63

 Expenditures

Amount expended for text books and supplies

$148.68

Amount paid for teachers saleries (regular)

$3032.00

Amount paid for teachers saleries (special)

$50.50

Amount paid for superintendent and expenses of district

$378.10

Amount paid school board service and expences

$95.00

Amount paid truant officer including enumeration of children

$21.85

Amount paid other district officers, treasurer

$30.25

Amount paid high school and acadamy tuition

$976.99

Amount paid for flags and appurtenances

$228.50

Amount paid for transportation of student

$228.50

Amount paid for repairs

$15.97

Amount paid insurance

$0.00

Amount paid janitor services cleaning

$283.70

Amount paid for fuel

$400.03

Amount paid for telephone

$13.32

Amount unclassified expenditures not included above

$49.45

Amount paid for elelmentary school tuition

$5.00

Amount paid Iona savings bank for note in part

$250.00

Amount paid Iona savings bank interest to Feb. 1 1918

$62.25

Total expenditures

$6041.59

Balance

$818.04

Due Belmont school district for tuition

$12.60

Balance due from Iona bank note

$750.00

Report of Superintendent of Schools

To the School board and the citizens of Belmont School District:

     I herewith present to you my third annual report as superintenendent of schools. I shall make no attempt in this report to cover the full ground of school activities and interests but shall cinfine myself to the consiteration of some matters which may be of greater importance and may have our larger interest.

     The statisitical table printed on another page cover the scholastic year ending June last. The present arrangement of the school register which is furnished by the state makes it difficult to give detailed school statisitics strictly up to date. During the school year ending in June the average membership of all schools in town was 174 and average attendance was 158. the percent of attendance was 91. The superintenedent made 181 visits to the schools.

     The following table shows the schools which have been in session since Sept. the teachers and the saleries paid.

Gale school 1&2

Ivy M. Burleigh

$48.00 per month

Gale school 3&4

Bernice Putney

$48.00 per month

Gale school 5&6

Carrie L. Wyatt

$52.00 per month

Gale school 7&8

Mary C. Butler Prin

$56.00 per month

Lower Province

Blanch D. Weeks

$34.00 per month

Upper Province

Hazel Tinkham

$48.00 per month

Plummer

Alice Heyward

$48.00 per month

Union

Gladys M. Ryerson

$48.00 per month

Ladd Hill

Dorothy Page

$32.00 per month

     You will notice some increase in salaries paid to teachers. This increase is inevidable. We can no longer expect to secure efficient teacher at the saleries formally paid.

     We opened the new year in Sept. with an entierly new teaching staff in our rural schools Miss Dorothy Page graduated last June from Tilton Seminary, has done very well at Ladd Hill under conditions not altogether favorable. The others were experienced teachers. Miss Ryerson, Miss Heywood and MissTinkham hold state certificates secured through special work and study at summer schools.

     Miss J. Estelle Clifford, who had acted most acceptably as supervisor of music in our schools for four years, resigned. This necessary action was much regretted by all. Partly in the interest in economy and partly because acceptable candidates for the possition did not seem avalible the school board desideed to dispence with a music supervisor this year. I wish to commend the regular teachers for the fine spirit they have shown in continuing this work without assistance. I hope that provisions may be made for a music teacher next year.

     The enrollment in the schools this year was 185. The attendance this winter term has been irregular. The exceptionally severe winter weather has had an unfortunate effect on the attendance and necessarily on the school work.

     Closing exercises of the schools were held at the village June 21, Certificates of graduation were presented by the school board to thirteen students who completed the work of the eight grade and who were certified as qualified to take up high school work. The following was a list of graduates: Gale School,  Olive Baker, Ethel Gault, Mildred Hammel, Delia Whitehouse, Irene Perron, Worchester Cushing, Wendall Dearborn, Theodore Hill, Everett Weeks, Norman Muzzey.  Union School, Hervey Dube, Emeline Perkins, Stephan Perkins.

     In addition Marion Tipple completed the work of the 8th grade at Lochmere. Four of these pupils are now attending higher schools. It is probable that another year more will go. This present year there have been nineteen pupils from Belmont attending approved secondary schools.

     I am glad to report the continuied interest shown by the children of the Gale school in the school savings bank. At this time of this writing there have been deposits of over $75.00 since the opening of school in September and only a negligable amount has been withdrawn.

     The world tragedy which has already effected our lives and which doubtless result in the reorganization of the life of the world has been felt in the schoolroom. The school that does not turn out boys and girls imbued with love for country, with a patriotism that seeks expression in service is a failure. The school today is not unmindful of its duty and of its privilege. While this war must be faught and won by those of us whom are older there is a part which the school and the school children must perform. And all over the land these forces are being organized and have already made good accounts of themselves. The eagerness with which the children have met these calls is argueus well for the future. Knitting, almost a lost art, has come back to its own and even boys as well as girls are finding herein both pleasure and profit to themselves and at the same time are rendering the district a service. New lessons of thrift are being taught and practiced throught the purchase of thrift and war savings stamps, and the government has even called on the children to teach the great lesson of thrift to their parents. The schoolchildren are taking a part in promoting food conservation as well as increasing the food supply. The school-home garden movement was pushed vigorously last summer. Teachers and children are planning to work much harder this coming summer and we hope that everyone of our school children may have his home garden. A large number of our older boys and girls are to enlist in our keep a pig movement this spring. All these activities are highly educative. The children are being taught practical patriotism. They are giving their country appreciable service and help in it's time of need.

     Chapter 114 of the laws of 1917 provides that the school board of every district shall hereafter cause to be inserted in the warrant for the annual meeting of said district an article relating to the adoption of the provisions of chapter 83 of the laws of 1913,  providing for the medical inspection of schools, unless said district has already adopted the laws of said chapter. The warrant for the school meeting contains such an article. In as much as we have had medical inspections for two years we are more or less familiar with this act. Suffice to state that the object of the act is to safeguard the health of the school children by providing an annuall examination of each child, unless exempt, and of every teacher, and a careful inspection of every outhouse school house and grounds. The law further provides for the testing of sight and hearing of each child and makes possible the detection and correction of such physical defects can be remedied. It is obvious that this law can not fail to prove a positive benefit if carefully administered and the cooperation of home secured.

     I have taken the occasion before calling attention to the unsatisfactory condition of some of our rural school buildings, especially the outhouses. The state now insists that that every child shall attend school and insisits that every school building whether in the village or city or country shall be safe and sanitary for school purposes. Particularly I would point out again how inadequate the Upper Province Road building is for meeting the demands of the school. I am certain that it would not meet the test of state inspection. I urgently recommend that a special appropritation be made to remedy these obvious defects.

     Chapter 122 of the state laws of 1917 provides a fiscal year of school districts beginning Feb. 16, 1917 shall end August 31, 1918 and thereafter the fiscal year of scholastic year shall end August 31 annually. This means that the present finacial year instead of being 12 months will now be eighteen months, a condition which of course was not provided for when the appropriations were made a year ago. It will be necessary for the school meeting to make a deficiency appropriation to meet the expences of the school district throught the spring term and in fact to August 31, when this financial year closes. In addition it will be necessary to make provisions for the full year of school beginning Sept. 1, next.

     This report would not be complete without mention of the death of Mr. Chaplin who for many years was identified with our schools as a truant officer. Mr. Chaplin always manifested an active personal interest in his work and the welfare of our schools.

     I wish to thank all who have had part in helping to make my work a pleasure and especially would like to thank the teachers whose loyalty has made possible such messures of success as the work has attained. I would further record the assistance of the school board and the courtesy and forebearance which they accorded me.

Respectfully submitted,     

Channing T. Sanborn

 Roll of Honor

Spring term : pupils not showing absent nor tardy

Gale 1&2

Guy Sewell.

Gale 3&4

Chester Bessette, Aurthur Hill, George Lombard, Vina Bryant,Natalie Harvey, Thelma Harvey.

Gale 5&6

Leigh Bryant, Albert Sewell, Phillip Smith.

Gale 7&8

Grace Marden, Rena Huntoon, Maitland Knowles.

Ladd Hill

Robert Rickert.

Union

Hervey Dube, Eunice Grant, Viola Grant, Elizabeth Horn, Emeiline Perkins,

Plummer

Evon Levasseur, Dora Levasseur.

Upper Province Road

Rena Lamprey, Olive Pucci, Tessy Pucci, Sebastain Pucci, Marion Lamprey.

For the year ending June 1917 pupils not showing absent nor tardy

Gale School

Vina Bryant

Upper Province Road

Olive Pucci, Tessy Pucci.

Union

Eunice Grant, Viola Grant.

Ladd Hill

Robert Rickert

Treasurer's Report

Feb. 15 Balance at hand

$136.32

Received from town dog license money

$193.20

Received from town appropriation by vote

$1,900.00

Received from town by law

$1,650.00

Received from town for high school tuition

$1,050.00

Received from town for supplies

$300.00

Received from town on note

$250.00

Received from town district officers

$150.00

Received from town for repairs

$200.00

Received from town for flags and poles

$15.00

Received from state of NH

$999.41

Received from Clarice Gilman refund

$7.50

Received from Hazel Tinkham refund

$6.00

James Hill Paper sold

$2.20

Total Amount received

$6,859.63

Paid Teachers salaries

$3,032.00

Paid Music

$50.50

Paid Supervision

$378.10

Paid School Board

$95.00

Paid Truant officer and census

$21.85

Paid Treasurer and postage

$27.75

Paid Clerck

$2.50

Paid Tuition high school

$976.99

Paid Tuition for elelmentary school

$5.00

Paid Transportation

$228.50

Paid Janitor service and cleaning

$283.70

Paid Text books and supplies

$148.68

Paid Fuel

$400.03

Paid Telephone

$13.32

Paid Repairs

$15.97

Paid Note in Part

$312.25

Paid Miscellaneous

$49.45

Totals

$6,041.59

Balance cash on hand

$818.04